Paper 2. Question 2. Examiner Tips.

Standard
  • The second half of this question will be more demanding than the first. You need to give equal attention to each part and provide at least half a page for each.
  • You should aim for 5 relevant quotations in each part of the question. Give the quotation, in quotation marks, explain its meaning, and then explain its effect on the passage. You cannot get higher than 3 marks if you only identify quotations, or higher than 6 marks if you discuss only meanings.
  • For 10 out of 10 you should give a full range of explained effects and link them into an overview which shows understanding of what the writer was trying to achieve in the passage as a whole.
  • Do not select a quotation which you do not understand as you will not be able to explain either its meaning or its effect.
  • When explaining a quotation do not repeat the words used in it. Do not repeat quotations; you cannot get credit more than once.
  • Generalised and ‘gushing’ comments such as ‘The writer makes me feel as though I am there’ and ‘The passage is cleverly written’ gain no marks and give the impression that you are failing to find things to say.
  • There is no need to use technical terms, and they are no substitute for explaining an effect in your own words; if you do use technical terms, such as onomatopoeia, make sure they are actually correctly used.
  • Select brief quotations only, of between one and four words. Do not lift whole chunks of text, or clump quotations together, or list them. Each one must be focused on specific use of language and explained separately.
  • Introduce your choices of language with phrases such as ‘gives the impression of’, ‘suggests that’, ‘makes me think that.’ Do not say over and over again ‘This has the effect that…’
  • Once you have arrived at an overview, do not contradict yourself, e.g. do not say that one quotation makes a character seem physically old and another one makes her seem physically young. This is not likely therefore you need to look at the passage again. However, there are no ‘right answers’ to this (or any other) part of the exam and you can score highly by engaging with the text and thinking about the way language is being used, whether or not your comments are what the examiner is expecting.
  • Things to look for are: use of the five senses; use of contrast; use of colour; use of noise; links between subject and environment; surprising, or unusual words; words which create sound effects; unusual or dramatic punctuation; imagery (similes and metaphors)
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2 responses »

  1. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THE NOTES
    HAVE MY IGCSE FINAL EXAM IN 6 DAYS
    AND THESE NOTES HELPED ME A LOT..
    REALLY HOPING FOR AN A *
    SO FINGERS CROSSED

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